Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Pin 32–ammonia cleans gas stove grates

Hello again!  Lovely to have you back…  I hope no one was too bored with all the paint pins!  But we are on to new things this week.  When we bought our house I wasn’t sure how I felt about the gas range that came with the house.  Almost 3 years later I LOVE cooking on it but HATE keeping it clean.  It has a black top which makes every little crumb and spot show up immediately.  I am not the neatest of cooks so it gets dirty all the time and it’s hard to wipe up when it’s still hot and harder to remember to wipe it up once it has cooled down.  So I end up with nasty grates.  I saw THIS PIN and had high hopes for a small effort big results cleaning solution.
dirty gas stove gratedirtry stove grate
So I got my ziploc bag and ammonia out.  The first problem was my grate did not fit in the bag.  So I had to improvise, using small kitchen trash bags (I doubled up just in case of leaking).  Then I added 3 T of ammonia (the pin says 2-3 but since mine were so gross I did the 3), tied up the bag and shook a bit.  Then I left it on the counter overnight. This is what I got.
grate still dirty after ammoniaammonia cleaned grease

It seemed to take some of the nastiness off the bottom areas but not anywhere else.  Major disappointment. :(
Bottom line – don’t bother
There was definitely grease taken off but not enough.  I might try soaking over night (submerged) in a tub of diluted ammonia next time.  Somehow I don’t think this lazy girl will be getting a clean stove without some scrubbing action though!
Stephanie

8 comments:

  1. I was wondering about this one! I'm super sensitive to ammonia, so not something I'll probably ever have tried - but good to know I shouldn't bother.

    I feel like there's a pin about doing something similar (plastic bag, grates) but with oven-cleaner instead... Perhaps you should check that one out - anything is better than scrubbing right?

    Sarah

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    1. Totally right Sarah! I'll have to check it out!

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  2. the fumes are what helps dissolve the gunk, no need to submerge. just make sure you put the grates in s ziplock bag with maybe an 1/8 c ammonia per grate. i did this with 5 year old nasty grates, left in bags about 13 hours, and with a brush, a sinkful of hot soapy water and elbow grease, my grates and burner covers are beautiful again!

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  3. Actually, it does work, try again! I put my ammonia in a sprayer and spray it over the burners / burner pans. The fumes are part of what work, but I do think that the moisture helps loosen up the crud. Also really sealing them in something will help. Mine don't fit in ziplocks either, so I use plastic grocery bags & double or triple bag them, tying each one shut really well. Then I stick them inside the oven overnight (take off the oven knob, so you don't forget & turn it on). I do use a scrubber when I wash them off the next day, but - short of buying new ones - this is the only thing that gets my stovetop looking (nearly) new.

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  4. I live in military housing and they seemed to think it was funny to put in a white stove with white grates :( I had tried almost everything short of blowing the things up when a friend down the road said to throw them in the oven next time I used the "self clean" mode. Guess what it worked. NO SCRUBBING, NO CHEMICALS, NO ... WORK. Minus the cracks on the grate from whomever lived here before us the looked like new.

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    1. that sounds amazing! thanks for sharing :) I will def try this next time!

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  5. I'm a professional maid, and I use this trick all the time to clean both gas stove grates, and the rings and cups on electric stoves. I use a lot of ammonia (at least 1 cup) and make sure everything gets wet. The worse the build-up, the longer you have to let it sit, but they will clean up with almost no effort; just a quick wipe with a wet cloth. The fumes are very strong, so ventilation is key! :)

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